Monthly Archives: November 2008

Tuesday xxx. November 1591.

30 November 2008

This day before dawn did a large force of ours with great stealth and cunning, and to pay back the actions of several days past, steal into place about the port to lay an ambuscado; and about an hour past dawn marched out the corps du guard and took they their positions on watch the which were somewhat out from the port and I with Sir R. W. in the trenches hard by and he caused our hagabushers and muskets to fire upon them, and by and by to trick them into advancing we did retreat so that we might draw them further out but when it came time for the sign to be given to attack, the which was to be Sir T. B. throwing up his hat, Captain Barton and his company saw not the sign and with our men calling out to them, the enemy took alarm and ran back to the port as fast as they might and we were not able to entrap them; in our retreat the enemy his artillery shot at us and one bullet did kill d’Hallot his horse and broke his leg the which they say is not a bad wound but we shall see if it be so; this night we supped on capons and drank much good wine and had a good fire as well.

The account of this fight is recounted in Coningsby as is the supper of capons.

Coningsby, Thomas, Jornall of Cheife Thinges Happened in Our Jorney from Deape the 13. of Auguste, Untyll, MS.- Harl. 288. f. 253279, p. 52-53. Camden Miscellany by Camden Society (Great Britain), Royal Historical Society (Great Britain), published by Camden Society, 1847 Item notes: v.1 (1847)

Monday xxviiij. November 1591.

29 November 2008

This day I kept to my quarters it being quite cold and raw and my face being bandaged from my wound yesterday, likewise I have sent my man to take my burgonet to the armorer for some repair the cheek piece being broken along its edge from the bullet; after supper came M. du Lac to call upon me and brought gossip about the King and how he would have gone to Dieppe to make his devotions to some saint there and lay his sword upon her altar but that the Marshall saith that he would take his Gascons all off to home if he did so thus staying his hand for now; du Lac brought some wine the which is rather dear in the French camp just now and some tobacco as well the which has done well to relieve the pain from my wound.

Luke is rather a bit too bandaged up to do much today and that combined with the weather and the cold day kept him home. King Henri apparently was see some woman in Dieppe at this time who was not his “official” mistress Gabrielle d’Estree. During the siege of Paris he was carrying on with an abbess!

Coningsby, Thomas, Jornall of Cheife Thinges Happened in Our Jorney from Deape the 13. of Auguste, Untyll, MS.- Harl. 288. f. 253279, p. 52. Camden Miscellany by Camden Society (Great Britain), Royal Historical Society (Great Britain), published by Camden Society, 1847 Item notes: v.1 (1847)

Sunday xxviij. November 1591.

28 November 2008

This day around noon came a great sally of the garrison with some 1000 horse and 1000 foot, the horse with the mind to spike our pieces but were prevented by a Switzer who cut off his hand who would have done so and our horse was called up and we sweepeth down on their right and had some very good play and laid to it hand to fist with our swords and I wearing my new harness and glad of it too when one of their horse turneth about and shot at me with his pistol not 2 foot away but the breast being proof the bullet entered not and did glance across my arm, I spurred on my horse and grabbed him by the sleeve and pulled him off his mount but then was set upon by M. de Volpellyaire and again I dealt him a great blow this time on his arm cutting him well and he drew off but I did not follow being engaged with two more of his fellows who cut at me but could not gain an advantage until one of them pistoled me in the face cutting my cheek deeply, I then spurred my horse away back towards our lines with them in pursuit until I was seconded by some of my fellows the which did allow me to retreat to our camp; the surgeon doth say that my cheek bone is not broke and that all should heal well God willing; this night I did so long for my pipe and would have despaired of it when St. John did come with a small pouch the which we did enjoy greatly, it being late he did lay with me this night.

Coningsby attests to the large sally today and the attempted spiking of the guns. Spiking a cannon renders it temporarily useless by driving a nail into the touchhole. The specifics of the cavalry engagement are made up but are based on typical engagements of the time. Luke is extremely lucky he only was cut by the bullet, he could have had his brains blown out.

Coningsby, Thomas, Jornall of Cheife Thinges Happened in Our Jorney from Deape the 13. of Auguste, Untyll, MS.- Harl. 288. f. 253279, p. 51-52. Camden Miscellany by Camden Society (Great Britain), Royal Historical Society (Great Britain), published by Camden Society, 1847 Item notes: v.1 (1847)

Saturday xxvij. November 1591.

27 November 2008

This day word was come of the death of Sir C. H. of whom I had always thought of as a lively vigorous man but they say has been failing this year, on the 20th; the pestilent ague which has been present in the camp these several weeks has now carried off two or three hagabushers of Captain Acton his company; St. John and I supped and then very merry with much wine and we did drink the last of my tobacco and I am vexed that there be not a place within 30 miles where some might be had.

Sir C. H. is Sir Christopher Hatton who died on November 20 in England. There was a “pestilent ague,” probably typhus, going around the camp at that time according to Coningsby, stay tuned for more on that in coming days. Cornet St. John came to supper again and the boys got crocked and probably rather stoned as well. Tobacco of the period was more potent than modern varieties and the effect when it was smoked was probably rather like smoking pot.

Coningsby, Thomas, Jornall of Cheife Thinges Happened in Our Jorney from Deape the 13. of Auguste, Untyll, MS.- Harl. 288. f. 253279, p. 51. Camden Miscellany by Camden Society (Great Britain), Royal Historical Society (Great Britain), published by Camden Society, 1847 Item notes: v.1 (1847)

Friday xxvj. November 1591.

26 November 2008

This day at dawn did come again the drum and a time was appointed an hour hence to exchange M. de Volpellyaire; I did let him keep the clothes in which he stood (including his boots) and sold him back his sword, it being inferior to mine methinks; he was actually fine fellow, and rather skilled at music and a fine merry companion for the time he dwelt here; I have now 500 écu and that along with the 5/ paid me by Mr. S. earlier this month and various amounts won at games and received for other reasons doth mean I am ahead by about 67/ for the month; two regiments of the King his lances did come to camp this day and oh how sorry they look, all bedraggled and in such poor spirits for want of pay that our men seemeth so much more the gallants in comparison; the Allmayne Prince was shot in the foot this day as he stood in the trench with the King.

Luke has made a pot of money this month, not certainly a common occurrence, but something that could happen occasionally if he was lucky. The entry of the lances and Prince Christian being shot in the foot is attested to in Coningsby.

Coningsby, Thomas, Jornall of Cheife Thinges Happened in Our Jorney from Deape the 13. of Auguste, Untyll, MS.- Harl. 288. f. 253279, p. 50-51. Camden Miscellany by Camden Society (Great Britain), Royal Historical Society (Great Britain), published by Camden Society, 1847 Item notes: v.1 (1847)

Thursday xxv. November 1591.

25 November 2008

This day I did speak at length with my prisoner now that he is somewhat recovered and find that he is the M. de Vopellyaire; he doth have a very fine horse worth I should say above ijli. and saddle and accoutrements the which I will keep, likewise his harness seemeth to would fit me and I would keep that as well but the remainder I will sell him back and told him thus so that he would know my intentions; about an hour before midday came a drum to treat for my prisoner and carry my demands back to garrison and by and by he comes again and tells me they would not meet my terms and so I send him back again and so it continued ‘til near supper and I and M. de Vopellyaire did eat and later came the drum again with an acceptable answer and would pay me 500 écu and so tomorrow was set to exchange; the cornet I won of him, I will present to my Lord upon his return.

So Luke has a prisoner and has to deal with ransoming him.

Wednesday xxiiij. November 1591.

24 November 2008

This day did the enemy bombard our works; then about two hours after dawn did the sally out a large force with the intent to capture our trenches but our sentinels did sound the alarum and our hagabushers there drove back their first assault; then did we sally forth and fought man to man with their horse and I seeing their cornet alone with no other horse about him I riding up dealt him a great blow to his neck which cut him not but did make him reel in his saddle then turning about I dealt him a blow across this face which sent him sprawling off his mount and I did catch his standard as he fell; soon I was seconded by my valet and several others and then took we the cornet back to our quarters and his horse as well and the surgeon summoned to dress his wound; I expect he will fetch a good ransom.

Today’s events are not based on Coningsby who was off that day visiting the Marquis of Allegra (really). Hagabushers were shot who carried a lighter longarm than a musket which had the advantage of not needing a rest to support the barrel. The cornet would have been wearing a helmet, probably a burgonet, a gorget and a breast plate and back plate so Luke’s great blow wouldn’t have connected with bare flesh but it would certainly have knocked the wind out of him giving Luke a moment to turn about and hit him again across the face. Luke has captured the cornet’s flag, or cornet and is joined by his valet so he can bring the cornet back and hold him for ransom. Capturing a rich officer was a great prize and captured officers were usually treated well (the exception being that terrible incident with the Prince of Conde after the Battle of Jarnac).

Tuesday xxiij. November 1591.

23 November 2008

This day the enemy did make a great sally from the town when they did see some fires in our quarters in the hopes of taking us unawares and so was the rumor that a trench was taken but that was not so; then after the fires were quenched some of us who would pay the enemy back for his sally did take horse and in the mist that had settled down stole down to the guards before the gate and there set upon them and I did shoot one, and an officer no doubt for his fine helmet, square in the face and down went he and my companions did do likewise and we did have some pretty play when the garrison troop issued forth and wheeling my horse about I took after one of the garrison horse who had chased Mr. Thoreaux and so riding up to him I did place my pistol on his helmet and did shoot and though he reeled he pulled up and rode off, his helmet being pistol proof methinks, and I gave him chase and cut at him with my sword but could gain no advantage when he turning discharged his pistol at me the bullet thereof which did hit me on the side of my breastplate and then did skip and cut me across the arm the which did make it hard to hold my reins then we traded blows and I came about so I could take ahold of his sleeve and with a good pull I did unhorse him but I stayed not and spurred my horse off to our quarters; the surgeon dressed my arm and praise God my arm is but cut and the bone not broke.

The account of the sally and counter-sally are attested to in Coningsby. Luke’s account of his fight is made up but it is somewhat based on a cavalry engagement from the English Civil War between Captain Richard Atkyns and Sir Arthur Haselrig.

Atkyns, Richard, 1615-1677. The vindication of Richard Atkyns Esquire : As also a relation of several passages in the western-war, wherein he was concern’d. Together, with certain sighs or ejaculations at the end of every chapter. Dedicated to his particular friends: and intended to no other. London : [s.n.], printed MDCLXIX. [1669]

Coningsby, Thomas, Jornall of Cheife Thinges Happened in Our Jorney from Deape the 13. of Auguste, Untyll, MS.- Harl. 288. f. 253279, p. 48-49. Camden Miscellany by Camden Society (Great Britain), Royal Historical Society (Great Britain), published by Camden Society, 1847 Item notes: v.1 (1847)

Monday xxij. November 1591.

22 November 2008

This day did Sir H. U. hold a great feast at the King his quarter for the Allmaine general Prince Christian who speaketh perfect French and passing good English and who seemeth a most learned gentleman and Sir R. W. attendeth and I did wait upon him; I did meet du Lac about the King his quarters and he doth say that the Gascons are angry for want of pay; some small skirmishing about St. Katherines; after supper returned to the camp and so to St. John his quarters to eat and he tells me of the loss this day of my Lord his coach through the foolish willful actions of the coachmen who were bidden to wait for his troop to convey them but rather set off alone and were overtaken by enemy horse.

A busy day here for Luke. Sir H. U. is Sir Henry Unton the English ambassador to France and he has laid on a feast for the newly arrived Prince Christian of Anhalt-Bernburg. This news and the anecdotes about the cranky Gascons and the loss of Essex’s coach are drawn from Coningsby

Coningsby, Thomas, Jornall of Cheife Thinges Happened in Our Jorney from Deape the 13. of Auguste, Untyll, MS.- Harl. 288. f. 253279, p. 48-49. Camden Miscellany by Camden Society (Great Britain), Royal Historical Society (Great Britain), published by Camden Society, 1847 Item notes: v.1 (1847)

Sunday xxj. November 1591.

21 November 2008

I stirred not from this place this day; we did watch the pioneers their work and the planting of some of the Kings cannon; the Marshall and the Gascons had a fair skirmish but had to give ground and they say that the garrison troops were led by a mass priest who was slain.

Today’s events are chronicled in Coningsby.

Coningsby, Thomas, Jornall of Cheife Thinges Happened in Our Jorney from Deape the 13. of Auguste, Untyll, MS.- Harl. 288. f. 253279, p. 47. Camden Miscellany by Camden Society (Great Britain), Royal Historical Society (Great Britain), published by Camden Society, 1847 Item notes: v.1 (1847)

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